Flash(back) Club Penguin #3: Sled Time, All the Time

It seems to be that no matter how often the Club Penguin universe changes, sled racing always sticks around. Sled racing in Club Penguin history has evolved and jumped to different platforms.

Sled Racing: The First to Start it All

No Club Penguin player should ever forget Flash Club Penguin’s classic multiplayer mini-game, that was, Sled Racing. It came all the way from beta testing in 2005 and became the fundamental experience of classic Club Penguin for over 11 years, before the Flash-based game closed. And those old blue penguins clapping endlessly for all the finishers (until Flash CP shut down) will always be remembered. The gameplay was super simple, just use the arrow keys to move to the left or right in order to avoid obstacles which are all obvious, and speed up using ice patches. This sled game was the standard in Club Penguin culture and still is, even if we cannot play it anymore. It has paved the way for new sled racing experiences in the future, which we will explore up next.


Test Run: Sled Racing’s EPIC Extension

Thought Sled Racing was too easy? Then try out Test Run, which literally tested your ability to sled. This was a fun part of Mission 2 of the Penguin Secret Agency, released in 2006. You used the mouse to control your maneuvers to the left and the right. Extra obstacles attempted to knock you off the sled. On top of that, the obstacles appeared much quicker than in the multiplayer mini-game that the CP team based this fun, little game from. So, you had to react much quicker. If you hit enough obstacles, you will crash right there and then where you last hit one. Even if you are a pro at this game, you will eventually crash at the end. I remember entering PSA Mission 2 just to play this game. Sometimes, I made it to the end and sometimes I didn’t. Test Run was a second-person player game (I think), which means you controlled your sled as if you got caught in all the action right behind your sled, rather than from a bird’s eye view from Sled Racing. This made the Test Run gameplay exciting, fast-paced, and full of thrills!


Sled and Slide: the Overlooked Sledding Game

Both of these images came from Club Penguin’s commercial for their Game Day video game for the Nintendo Wii. In the first image, who do you think is more determined to win, the kid on the left or the right? Or maybe the question should be who is the better actor for the commercial?

When Club Penguin players talk about mini-games, I believe that those from the Game Day video game are often overlooked. Sled and Slide is a mini-game from the Game Day Nintendo Wii video game, released in 2010, that allowed players to have the only bobsledding experience that Club Penguin had ever offered. The gameplay involves moving the Wii remote to the left or right to move in the direction where you want to go in the bobsled.  It is definitely different from other sledding games. First, this is an exclusive for the Nintendo Wii. Second, this is a teamwork-based game. Your team members participate in your bobsled race. Everybody should do a good job in order to achieve the fastest time. Third, at the start of the race, you have to run with the bobsled by furiously shaking the Wii remote to get it going before you could hop in and start steering. Fourth, the obstacles includes things like large snowmen and ice sheets. Fifth, you have very long tunnels to ride through. There are more differences, but I think I have covered the majority. It is a challenging game that provided Club Penguin fans a different type of sledding experience.


Sled Racer: More Than Just a Jump to Mobile

Let’s fast forward to the era of Club Penguin history in which the great emphasis on the mobile platform was beginning. Sled Racer was an app all on its own, launched in 2014 for iOS and 2015 for Android. It was still a part of the Club Penguin universe, but could not be played in the Flash version of Club Penguin nor the Club Penguin app. Sled Racer maximized the potential of sled racing. Simple sleds and downhill slopes were not enough. You had to deal with avoiding sabertoothed Fluffy fish, cacti, and other crazy obstacles. Logs just did not cut it. The game had no end, so you could go as far as you could before you crashed into something. It was a second-person game like Test Run. What made this game very special from other Club Penguin games was that although you could not ride alongside other players, there were public leaderboards showing players’ best scores. You could even earn the Golden Goggles for being at the top of the Friends’ Leaderboard. You could wear this special item on your penguin in the Club Penguin game and show off just what an amazing sled racer you were. The gameplay, in my opinion, was superior. The controls were simple and easy to use. You also had exciting and absurd power-ups (just for the members) that could help you on your danger-filled and thrilling sled race. It was one of Club Penguin’s several apps that they stopped developing due to Club Penguin Island.


Club Penguin Island’s Response to Sled Games

After classic Club Penguin closed its doors earlier this year, so did the old Sled Racing game that was more than a decade old. No fear! Your thrills down the mountain slopes as a Club Penguin player did not leap off the cliff into extinction. The latest Club Penguin Island update brought the sled racing experience back, here in 2017. I don’t know if there is an official name for it, but the sign in the game placed before the sled racing says “Tube Races” so I’m just gonna call it that. I’m sorry, but I am not a fan of the gameplay part of Tube Races.  Here is my opinion and explanation from my Mt. Blizzard review:

The tubing game is only okay, in my opinion. This is because the controls are not as friendly as they could be. Think of the old Sled Racer app’s controls. They had left and right arrows to steer. You have a trackpad on CPI, which makes it harder to control the tube. That being said, I never was cut out for mobile platform gaming. I would love to play this tubing game on a computer (oh, how I miss you, arrow keys) or even a gaming controller. Still, it is a very fun game and a fantastic way to spend time on the island and make friends. The tubing competition could get hot for such a cold place. 😉

The best parts of Tube Races are the multiplayer experience and ease of access. You can play with as many players as you want and enter the game smoothly and quickly. Gameplay is only acceptable; partly due to reasons that I stated above from my Mt. Blizzard review and that there are not any obstacles that actually slow your speed down very much. You depend on maneuvering quickly through turns. There could be more strategies, but I’m not aware of any others, at this point. But what makes this game stand out from any of Club Penguin’s other sled racing games is the fact that you can wear all your clothes while you are playing. And that’s seriously awesome! Riding with style. You also have an assortment of tubes to ride. They are all the same speed, but they have a different personality and appearance for each one.


Sled racing has come a very long way. Starting from a humble, little, Flash game called Sled Racing from Club Penguin’s beta party, and now to the Unity 3D, fast-paced, and quite different Tube Races of Club Penguin Island, sled racing has undergone changes for Club Penguin players throughout the years. This Club Penguin activity has kept up with the times and let the fans have constant fun, whether it be on a computer, a mobile device, or even a Nintendo console. Despite the evolutionary changes to sled racing, what has remained is competitive fun and challenges for players (oh, and snow and tubes/sleds. Can’t have sled races without them.)

What is your favorite Club Penguin sled race game? Will there be new ones in the future?

I have an idea for a belly slide sort of game. Penguins in real life are known for belly sliding, but Club Penguin has not made this action evident for its penguins. What if there were to be a belly slide game someday?

Island Inhabitant #2: Mountain Blizzard Review

I will leave it up to you for finding out what Club Penguin Island’s new area, Mt. Blizzard, features (and hides). I have been doing some exploring, including during the time while the update was out for only some Android players.

Here is what I have to say about this place:

The tubing game is only okay, in my opinion. This is because the controls are not as friendly as they could be. Think of the old Sled Racer app’s controls. They had left and right arrows to steer. You have a trackpad on CPI, which makes it harder to control the tube. That being said, I never was cut out for mobile platform gaming. I would love to play this tubing game on a computer (oh, how I miss you, arrow keys) or even a gaming controller. Still, it is a very fun game and a fantastic way to spend time on the island and make friends. The tubing competition could get hot for such a cold place. 😉

When finishing the tubing game, you are ranked with trophies based on your completion time. Here is an idea to make the game even more of an incentive to play: as rewards for getting fast times, you could earn XP points, exclusive items, and special tubes! Like this idea and you use Twitter? Retweet this tweet in support and hopefully, the CP team will take it into serious consideration…

The climbing wall game (where you jump on trampoline targets to climb up) is a little bit frustrating to play, for me. Again, arrow keys are where it’s at. I would prefer doing other things around Mt. Blizzard than this. However, if I come with friends, it is way more enjoyable. 😀

Mt. Blizzard, without a doubt, brings back the cold, snowy atmosphere of the old Club Penguin, making it a nostalgic place, filled with wonder. I think of this area like the upgraded, more vibrant, exciting combination of old CP’s Ski Village and Ski Hill. It has ski lifts penguins can actually ride (unlike the old island), loads of snow, enormous trees, tubes all around, and much more. Overall, Mt. Blizzard reminds me so much of the classic Club Penguin, with additional things to explore, such as a waterfall, a climb up the mountain, new tube tracks, more discreet hints lying here and there, and too much to say in sentence!! The winter wonderland magic is back.

Ending off this post with a tweet and picture of Mt. Blizzard by @TorqueCP!

Flash(back) Club Penguin #2: Sub-Communities

Ah, the Club Penguin community. It’s a virtual community that lives and breathes like communities in real-life. There’s happiness, moments of celebrations, drama, and more. We have always treasured the Club Penguin community as a whole and that will always remain true for the Club Penguin fans. 🙂

Having said that, I do not think sub-communities have enough recognition, especially with the absence of original Club Penguin. Sub-communities are intricate, vital parts of the complete Club Penguin community. What do I mean by Club Penguin sub-communities? These are communities within the main community that contain unique qualities and penguins thrive in this smaller community that supplies support for the main community. You may know what I’m talking about when I bring up examples: pookies, CPMV (Club Penguin Music Video) creators, armies, and more.

I strongly believe Club Penguin Island has so much potential for greatness and even a revival in another heyday era of CP history. However, I am afraid of a possible result of this progress: the decline or even the end of some sub-communities. As with progress, it is inevitable that new things come about while some old things are left in the dust. It has happened in history so many times… languages, civilizations, and social structures have disappeared from modern people’s knowledge.

Okay, I think I am starting to get very serious on this topic here! But it is an analogy to try to help you, the reader whom I appreciate reading this far and hopefully to the end of this post, comprehend my concern for the existence of older sub-communities and compare them to history you may have learned in school. Anyway, I completely understand such happenings in history. I also understand that, again commonly found in history and Club Penguin is no exception, there are beginnings of new sub-communities as a result of the new game, CPI. Nevertheless, I hope that sub-communities that have ultimately depended on classic Club Penguin to log on and run will continue on Club Penguin Island. Or at least be remembered if they have ceased running.

To get the community more involved, I went to Twitter to ask others sub-communities that they remember. Thank you for your numerous responses! I have included the tweets they have sent to me. There are so many sub-communities, some well-known, some obscure. I don’t think I could include all. Definitely though, here are lots…

A huge thank you to Athena for providing an insightful and detailed history of some major sub-communities, and even how some affected others. Some of you older players remember her as Cw700, Swan, an amazing graphic designer, a CPMV maker, and a cheeky girl. And remember when “thanks cw” was a thing? If you don’t know the significance of this statement, let’s just say we basically overused it a lot. Uhh, whoops, back to the sub-community subject. Anyway, she granted me permission to have the history she kindly explained on here for you to read and learn!

As you should know by now, sub-communities immensely comprise the classic Club Penguin community. Some will come to Club Penguin Island, some will not. As time goes by during the era of Club Penguin Island, will we see any old sub-communities make a return? Time will tell.

The quality and extensiveness of this post would not be possible without the Twitter sub-community. 😉

Announcement: TWO New Blog Post Series!

Classic, Flash Club Penguin has closed their doors and is forever officially unplayable. Meanwhile, a brand new game has made its debut worldwide, allowing us to have different adventures in store: Club Penguin Island. I want to celebrate our future together AND keep the memories of our past alive.

I am very proud and happy to announce that my blog will have TWO, NEW, ORIGINAL blog post series: Flash(back) Club Penguin in regard to our original game… AND the other is called Island Inhabitant in regard to our new game.

Flash(back) Club Penguin aims to explore the old Club Penguin, even after inaccessible for the players, bring about memories, and suggest classic features to add to CP Island.

Island Inhabitant is written by… a Club Penguin Island inhabitant! This other series is focused on reviewing the game, stating activities to do (in case you’re bored on there), provide suggestions for this young game, and MOST of all, supporting the Club Penguin team all the way. Because they had a rough start with CPI, I am trying to help them with this series by believing in that they will improve the game in ways that will satisfy lots of people!

There will be a few new graphics for my blog design and the blog post series, as well. I can’t wait to continue my hobby of Club Penguin blogging with you all!

Tech70’s Club Penguin blog: Classic Club Penguin + Club Penguin Island

FIND FOUR: Tech70’s Journey; #CPReunion After-Party; Strategies; and More

Believe me, you do NOT want to miss a sentence in this entire post, even though it’s pretty long. This is probably the most thorough Find Four post in the entire Club Penguin blogging community.

You’ll read about my personal story of my time with Find Four, the Find Four craze after the #CPReunion, strategies I have picked up over time (and because classic Club Penguin’s closing soon, this is a good time to reveal them, I suppose) and the importance that this seemingly little game offers.

TECH70’S FIND FOUR JOURNEY

It started in 2010, when I first joined Club Penguin. I fell in love with this game of strategy the first time I had ever played it in my entire life. From here on out, I would constantly play Find Four and improve myself each time. I would say that for my almost 7 years of playing Find Four, I won most of the time, but I have lost a few times because of silly mistakes of not seeing the obvious or competing against other great Find Four experts!

Three or four years ago, I had been playing Find Four with some players I had met for a couple of hours without taking any breaks. As a result, I got my very FIRST migraine. It was a horrible experience afterwards. For more than a day, all I could think about was CONSTANT pain in my head and I could NOT think straight whatsoever. Luckily, I recovered, but I learned that I should control my usage of playing in front of a screen better.

Hopefully, the journey of Find Four with my penguin pals can continue on Club Penguin Island if the game is added someday.

#CPReunion AFTER-PARTY: FIND FOUR

The after-party #CPReunion was a total blast! It took place in the Lodge Attic with many familiar, old friends. I ensured each Find Four move I made was done with care… SO MUCH care in fact, that I had spent up to two minutes thinking of just which move to make next.

First session:

The Find Four craze after the #CPReunion on server Marshmallow really fired up with three people: Perapin, Chilly0ne, and me. I played some rounds with the both of them and they were not able to beat me. As a result, they were very desperate trying to find somebody who could, haha!

I played many people during their time of desperateness, but I still was victorious in every match, even with those who were known to be champs. There was a tie-game with Riyita, as well… a bit too close for comfort! I am not too sure how long this session was, probably between 1-2 hours, and was super intense for me and my brain.

Second session:

My second session was not-so-great for my record. I had lost five out of the six matches during this, because my next opponents are pros and did their best! Plus, my brain was already worn out.

I had intended to stop playing Find Four after the first session, but then I saw C0mputerguy and Firepup16 on Twitter challenge me to Find Four. Despite the exhaustion from the first round, I still accepted anyway for two reasons: to see who could break my flawless record and playing Find Four on Club Penguin will not be possible after CP closes.

After a 10-minute break from the first session, I came online to server Brumby for the second session with C0mputerguy and Firepup16. C0mputerguy was able to beat me, therefore breaking my record! I was very proud of him, but not surprisingly, I was a little bit sad, too. Ah well! Then, Firepup16 tried to win a match with me, but he did not get to. Still, I could tell by the way he played that he was a fantastic player!

Then, Tommy58562 decided to have a rematch after he had lost in the first session. His effort paid off, he was able to beat me in our second Find Four match, therefore having a tie! Nice work, Tommy!

I started a best-of-3 round with C0mputerguy, and I won the second round. It all goes down to the third round, which C0mputerguy had won! Congratulations, dude! The last person to play with me was Alana Cp, who also beat me fair and square. Another congratulations to this Find Four expert!

By time I was completely done with Find Four for the day, I cannot explain how TIRED and DONE my brain was after too much time thinking about Find Four moves and strategies. But I am glad to have spent these last few and memorable Find Four moments with wonderful and talented pals. I am also glad that my losses in some of the Find Four matches have exemplified that nobody is perfect. 🙂

AFTER-PARTY PICTURES AND TWEETS

Just one of the many intense, thrilling Find Four matches! And there’s my iconic wink. Better watch out when that happens.

 

 

FINAL RESULTS

 Who did not win against me:

  • Chilly0ne (2 games: Tech70 win both)
  • Perapin (2 games: Tech70 won both)
  • Pup1one
  • Mikou
  • Pup1one
  • Waddles4g1
  • Midnight Emo
  • Firepup16

Who won against me:

  • C0mputerguy (best of 3: C0mp won first, Tech70 won second, C0mp won the third)
  • Alana Cp

Who tied with me:

  • Riyita
  • Tommy58562 (2 games: Tech70 won one, Tommy58562 won the next)

TECH70’S FIND FOUR STRATEGIES

Over the years, I have gained more Find Four experiences and learning new tricks, traps, and strategies. I never read a guide on how to win or anything like that, it’s all from experience.

  • If I make this move, what would the opponent’s move be? This is a question that I ask myself all the time for just about every single move that I make, which is why it takes me so long to play a game. I try to figure out the objective of the opponent based on the move they make.
    • Just one move can cost your victory. For example, it could actually HELP the opponent set up their trap. In fact, the opponent could be WAITING for you to move there.
    • Another costly move to quickly make traps, because your move could allow the opponent to block your potential traps.
  • Even two pieces in a row is an early danger and I closely pay attention to them. After all, it could eventually lead to a four-in-a-row.
  • Do not try to set a trap on your own. Just patiently wait for your opponent to land a piece in a spot that will help you.
  • Always try to set traps toward the bottom part of the game, because you need the earliest possible chances of winning.
  • Never try to rush because of peer pressure or something, because Find Four requires thinking, which in turn requires time.
  • Think of the offense versus the defense in sports. It’s like that in Find Four too. Based on the circumstances in the game, should I make a defensive move to protect myself from the other player’s trap? Or should I make an offensive move and set up my trap? Many times, you have to decide one way or the other. Sometimes, a move could serve both purposes… hooray!

What’s the big deal about Find Four?

 Find Four is one of those treasured games that is very easy to play, because the objective is simple and trying to reach that objective is comprehensible, in comparison to other games such as Mancala. Even so, Find Four challenges your mind. You are forced to think for your moves as well as the predictions of your opponent’s thinking.

Also, it is educational in the sense that it is a mathematical game that depends on logic to win.

And Find Four is fun, ’nuff said.

One of the most significant outcomes of playing Find Four is your increased experience with trying to predict what is coming next based on the circumstances presented, whether it be in a game or a situation in your life.

Additionally, other players can be an inspiration for you to improve your gameplay and eventually be as good as they are. Having fun with others while teaching and bettering skills with an easy-to-understand game… Find Four is a meaningful multiplayer game. Let’s hope that our Find Four days as penguins are not numbered. Club Penguin, please move Find Four over to Club Penguin Island.